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Antigone Pride Thesis Statements

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The notion of honor and justice is prevalent throughout all types of literature. In Greek culture, honor is essential for creating a solid foundation within a society and family. Honor will follow you until the day you perish, and beyond. The honor for men in Greece is spiritual in that loved ones show respect to the deceased by giving them a proper burial. Nevertheless, when a man acts upon betrayal of the city, that man looses the privilege to die in such honor. This is evident in the life of Antigone when her two brothers, Polyneices and Eteocles, both die at each other’s hands at war when deciding the ruler of Thebes. Polyneices cannot have a proper burial, because the new king, Antigone’s uncle, Creon created a law that decrees that…show more content…

However, the love that Antigone has for her brother, and her loyalty to the gods, drive her to continue her efforts to give him a burial because “at least [Polyneices] is [her] brother/…/ [She] will not prove false to him” even if she will be sacrificing her own life (51-52). For that reason, Antigone goes on this journey to give Polyneices a proper burial, and after several attempts, she finally succeeds.

Creon is furious at the blatant disregard for his law, and the disrespect shown towards his position as King, because “there is nothing worse than disobedience to authority” (726-727). Creon believes that since the gods ordained him to be king that his words should be equal to the gods, because the gods would never let someone rule in a way that they did not approve of. Creon, full of rage by this incredible insult, confronts Antigone about her disobedience: “And did you dare to disobey that law?” (493). Antigone, still very much happy and content with her decision to bury Polyneices and follow the law of the gods, answers very passionately and assertively:
“Yes, it was not Zeus that made the proclamation; / nor did Justice, which lives with those below, enact / such laws as that, for mankind. I did not believe / Your proclamation had such power to enable / One who will someday die to override / God’s

I can understand what you are feeling. I can also see your professor's point of view. Good papers have specific thesis statements. Moreover, the conflict between individual rights and power of the state has been done already many times. 

For an alternative thesis how about something in religion - like the hubris of Creon. If you go with this thesis, you can argue that leadership leads to hubris, blindness, and divine judgment. 

In the play,...

I can understand what you are feeling. I can also see your professor's point of view. Good papers have specific thesis statements. Moreover, the conflict between individual rights and power of the state has been done already many times. 

For an alternative thesis how about something in religion - like the hubris of Creon. If you go with this thesis, you can argue that leadership leads to hubris, blindness, and divine judgment. 

In the play, Creon orders that Polyneices should not be buried. Within the context of the ancient world this was a great taboo and impiety for all. This is why Teiresias tells Creon of the anger of the gods in view of his decision. The gods reject the prayers and sacrifices of the Thebans - something reminiscent of Oedipus, when he, too, was filled with pride, and by this also harmed Thebes. Teiresias also states that the furies will get angry. 

What makes the hubris of Creon even greater is that he punishes Antigone with being buried alive. Here is what Teiresias says:

"You have dishonored a living soul with exile in the tomb,
hurling a member of this world below.
You are detaining here, moreover
a dead body, unsanctified, and so unholy,
a subject of the nether-gods.'' 

In a word, the gods are angered at Creon's decisions.